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Feb 20 2006
'Net Neutrality' and Future Growth
Today's N.Y. Times (reg. req'd) has a pro-"net neutrality" editorial:

If access tiering takes hold, the Internet providers, rather than consumers, could become the driving force in how the Internet evolves. Those corporations' profit-driven choices, rather than users' choices, would determine which sites and methodologies succeed and fail. They also might be able to stifle promising innovations, like Internet telephony, that compete with their own business interests.

Telcos and cable companies (correctly) perceive the Internet to be a threat to or, in some cases, already eroding their core businesses and are frustrated that their pipes are feeding the growth of their competitors. One of the not-so-hidden dimensions of these debates is the desire of some of those same providers to stifle or at the very least control the development of the Internet and thus protect their traditional revenue streams, which are more certain and generally predictable than their ability to compete in an open Internet marketplace.

While it's not entirely clear how all this would play out, it's quite possible that local and small business marketing online would likely be harmed by such fees. Yet in the same way that China will ultimately not be able to control the Internet and free speech (notwithstanding the current complicity of the big Internet brands) the ISPs/access providers will not be able to control the trajectory and growth of the Internet.

Just as soon as these potential fee structures were implemented, assuming Congress doesn't intervene to prevent it, alternative access paradigms would emerge. There's too much competition, too much consumer demand and too much at stake for it not to happen.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  12:26 | permalink | comments [2] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 20 2006
MySpace: PR Nightmare in the Making
MySpace's phenomenal popularity with the teens and early twentysomethings generated a $580 million acquisition by the seventysomething Rupert Murdoch. Here are some truly impressive recent metrics on the site (according to comScore):

  • 24.2 million unique users in October 2005
  • 11.6 billion page views in October 2005
  • More page views than any destination other than Yahoo!, AOL and MSN.
  • Twice the page views of Google
But what goes up ...

Now the MySpace backlash has begun. Numerous stories about stalkers and sexual predators using MySpace to target teens have started to appear. While most users of MySpace at this point won't care about such stories, this is a PR nightmare in the making that threatens to take over the MySpace "success narrative."

Hence the consideration of a "MySpace Safety Czar." According to an article that appeared in the WSJ on Friday:

News Corp. is scrambling to make MySpace a safer place for young people. News Corp. plans to appoint a "safety czar" to oversee the site, launch an education campaign that may include letters to schools and public-service announcements to encourage children not to reveal their contact information. It also is considering limiting access to certain groups, such as "swingers," to those over 18; blocking search terms that predators could use to locate kids; and encouraging users between 14 and 16 to make their profiles "private," meaning they can only be viewed by people they already know.

"We're going to take some pretty dramatic steps to provide industry-leading safety," says Ross Levinsohn, president of News Corp.'s Fox Interactive Media unit, which includes MySpace.


As the Journal points out those measures might strike at the "cool factor" that has made MySpace such a hit among teens, who can be fickle and might not like the introduction of controls or restrictions. We'll see if the site can navigate this rough patch and regain control of its own story.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  08:29 | permalink | comments [3] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 20 2006
Adieu Jeeves
Chris Sherman at Search Engine Watch writes up a bit of the history of Ask Jeeves now that the butler's retirement is here. This is something that has been well over a year in coming. The question now is whether jettisoning the Jeeves part of the brand will help the engine gain share. Ask has been in the fourth or fifth position in terms of search market share, depending on whose numbers you consult.

One of the motivations behind IAC's acquisition of Ask was that it was to be the glue in the IAC system that knit together the disparate brands into a network of sorts. That network or more coherent whole has yet to materialize, though an Ask search box has been added to many IAC properties (see, e.g., RealEstate.com).

IAC-owned Citysearch provides the content for the Ask local product. The city guide has historically had a very strong brand in the local space (mostly in the A&E category), though it is somewhat weaker today in my view. However, over time, I could see the Ask brand taking over and being a broader, more effective starting point for local search at IAC.

One of the things that was nice about Ask Jeeves was that it had personality, which probably was a detriment in certain quarters. But at least it was a differentiator. While Ask owns top-tier search engine Teoma, great search results aren't enough at this point. The challenge now will be how to make the experience at Ask.com different and compelling enough to grab share from its larger competitors.

I think that the answer lies in some mix of unstructured and structured data (especially in local). For example, if About.com hadn't already been aquired by The N.Y. Times, it would have been a good property for Barry Diller to buy and fold into Ask results.

_________

More from Search Engine Journal.

Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  08:01 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]










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