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Mar 15 2006
Looking Ahead to DDC2006
As we get ready for our Drilling Down event in San Jose later this month, we are also setting our sights on Directory Driven Commerce 2006, our directory industry event, which happens this Sept. 18-20 in Los Angeles.

We are sticking with a simple, straightforward theme for DDC2006 � what does the future hold for the global Yellow Pages industry?

We've just confirmed our first featured speaker, Valerie Taylor, CEO of Platefood. Platefood is a London-based company that is a collaboration of the Australian directory publisher Sensis and FAST Search & Transfer to market a directory/search platform to Yellow Pages publishers.

We think Valerie will offer a compelling POV on at least one approach for publishers to remain competitive in a multi-platform future.

We plan to announce other featured speakers in the coming days and weeks.

We are now in the process of developing our map of conference sessions, and we welcome your ideas and feedback.

If you have an idea for a conference session topic, you can send me an e-mail with your ideas. I can't promise I will use every idea, but I will consider them all.
Blog: Global Yellow Pages Blog
 
posted by  Charles Laughlin at  17:21 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
Ingenio Launches Online Campaign for PPCall
A new banner just appeared on the home page of John Battelle's site touting PPCall as more "cost-effective" than clicks. Here's the landing page.

______

The ad appears now to be down.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  15:03 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
Amazon Implements Click-to-Call
Amazon adopts eStara's click-to-call functionality (written up in today's WSJ [sub. req'd]). The article confuses "click-to-call" and "pay-per-phone-call" (one is infrastructure; the other is revenue model).

eBay has begun to do the same thing in Europe with Skype.

Click-to-call facilitates buyer-seller interaction or can drive leads, which can potentially be monetized on a per-call billing model (PPCall). Regardless of whether calls are individually monetized, click-to-call provides additional value through tracking of the relationship between the Internet and the ultimate offline transaction.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  14:37 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
Local Effective? In a Word: Yes
Confirming what we already knew, research sponsored by CareerBuilder.com, Cars.com, Fathom Online, SuperPages.com and Volkswagen reflect that local online marketing/classifieds are highly effective. Here's a summary of the findings in BtoBOnline.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  14:10 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
Web Growth to Stall?
On the same day that Nielsen releases its bullish broadband numbers, this Web version of a story to appear in next week's BusinessWeek takes a contrarian view: "Why The Web Is Hitting A Wall. U.S. Internet growth is stalling. And it's not just the old or poor who are living offline."
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  13:53 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
A Different Sort of Local (Paid) Search
John Battelle has an interesting post about a New York public policy group that has taken out ads on Google grading New York state legislators' voting records. Political spending online is an important and growing area of geotargeted paid search (and other local online marketing) that we don't currently cover. But it's an increasingly important area.

These legislators are all public figures and so there is no defamation/libel issue from a reputable organization publicizing their voting records. But like some of the trademark questions on the commercial side, imagine how paid search might be used to disparage or negatively affect the reputation of an individual or local business. We may see a day relatively soon when individuals with any degree of professional or public visibility need to manage themselves just like brands on the Internet and buy their own names as keywords to protect (as well as advance) their reputations.

Think about this scenario: I have a bad experience with a local mechanic or other local contractor and am unable to satisfactorily resolve the dispute. I walk away angry and so I launch a search campaign (supported by a free blog) to tell the world about this corrupt mechanic (in my opinion).

Whenever that mechanic is searched for in a certain geography, my ad comes up telling people not to go there. If I'm skillful I could have a material impact on that business' reputation and outlook. I get sued and � maybe � Google or Yahoo! or MSN gets sued too.

This is the lawyer in me spinning out scenarios that probably won't come to pass. But there would be no way to police this kind of thing on an automated basis. The engine would have to have a grievance procedure � a kind of internal private arbitration where parties complain, ads are brought down pending some sort of resolution, etc.

Anyway (I hope I'm not giving anyone any ideas).

Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  13:34 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
AOL Begins Streaming 'Vintage' TV Shows
AOL begins streaming free full episodes of "vintage" or "classic" (some might say euphemisms for old) TV shows here. Like Live 8, this could prove an important moment for online video as broadband consumers get accustomed to watching full-length TV shows (as opposed to clips and shorts) on their PCs.

The viral elements (IM and e-mail) as well as the choice (the ability to watch any available episode) are noteworthy and strikingly different from conventional TV viewing. I must say, however, my limited experience with the site this morning was not entirely satisfying, but perhaps that's to be expected with a beta launch.

It's quite easy to see how contextually relevant, behaviorally or location targeted ads can and likely will be built around this, which shows the way for IPTV to some degree. One might argue that AOL is loading up too many distracting graphical ads around the experience already.

What will be important is how the public reacts to the content and uses the site.
_________

Here's more from USA Today and Reuters, with some information about advertiser demand and future plans for a subscription-based download service.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  07:33 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Mar 15 2006
Nielsen Says: Broadband Is Up (So Is Video)
After a series of pronouncements and surveys that argued broadband adoption had all but reached its apotheosis, Nielsen/NetRatings reported yesterday that broadband was still enjoying strong growth in the U.S.:

The number of active broadband users from home increased ... from 74.3 million in February 2005 to 95.5 million in February 2006 ... hitting an all-time high of 68 percent for active Internet users in February 2006 ... Overall Internet penetration in the US has stabilized over the past few years, reaching 74 percent at home in February 2006.


There's a lot at stake in whether consumers continue to adopt high-speed access and/or high-speed Internet access becomes more widely available (e.g., Wi-Fi hotspots, etc). Broadband/always-on access is the single factor more than any other that changes users' behavior and causes them to spend more time online doing more things, often at the expense of traditional media (though that typically depends on demographic and income/educational factors).

Rich media and video consumption also benefit from broadband. Here are Nielsen's data about the most trafficked U.S. video sites in February:
  1. MSN Video
  2. YouTube
  3. Google Video
  4. iFILM (now owned by Viacom/MTV)
  5. video.search.yahoo.com
Again, according to Nielsen:

MSN Video garnered 9.3 million unique visitors in February 2006, growing 44 percent over the previous year. YouTube and Google Video grew from relative obscurity in February 2005 to substantial players in February 2006, drawing 9.0 million and 6.2 million unique visitors, respectively. iFilm and Yahoo�s video search saw triple digit year-over-year growth in their visitation, drawing 4.3 million and 3.8 million unique visitors, respectively.

_________

Here's more on the politics of broadband.

Vaguely related: Harris Interactive survey data on news media consumption by media type and user age category (as you might imagine, the younger the consumer the more it skews toward online).



Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  06:42 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]





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