client login
Username
Remember Me
Forgot Password
Password
CATEGORIES
 
Local Media Blog [ 885 ]  RSS ATOM


Blog Home

Contact Kelsey

Bookmark this page



SEARCH
 


previous month  FEBRUARY 2006  next month
s m t w t f s
4
5 11
12 18
19 21 25
26


BLOG ARCHIVE
 
RSS ATOM  Full archive
 
current month



RECENT ENTRIES
 
 
RSS ATOM


BLOGGERS
 
admin [ 0 ]  RSS ATOM
Carlotta Mast [ 0 ]  RSS ATOM
Greg Sterling [ 725 ]  RSS ATOM
John Kelsey [ 52 ]  RSS ATOM
Matt Booth [ 0 ]  RSS ATOM
Mike Boland [ 80 ]  RSS ATOM
Neal Polachek [ 27 ]  RSS ATOM


COUNTER
 
Visitors    276897
Online users 143
 



Feb 28 2006
Google to Step Up Efforts
A piece that appeared in the WSJ today (sub. req'd) cites Google CFO George Reyes' remark that Google's growth "is slowing due to the 'law of large numbers' and it will need to find new ways to boost revenue." As one might expect, the stock took another hit.

I think this means several obvious things for Google:

  • Pushing out more aggressively in other online ad vehicles (display, PPCall, etc.)
  • Trying to go after more SMEs, which is challenging though not impossible, for all the reasons we've discussed at length
  • Going offline. There's a big Jefferson Graham piece in today's USA Today about Google's "offline" (traditional media) efforts
Unfortunate as slowing growth is for Google, it will make life much more interesting than it has been (how can it get any more "interesting?" you ask) � as Google takes some more "risks" and other companies are forced to react.

Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  11:44 | permalink | comments [1] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 27 2006
More on Google Click-to-Call
The New York Times has an interesting piece today on Google's click-to-call offering, and that of smaller companies such as eStara and Ingenio, that have offered pay-per-phone-call marketing products (the ad model built around the underlying click-to-call technology) for some time. What Google currently offers is not PPCall (it's not charging for it yet), but it is rather testing the click-to-call functionality on which a PPCall advertising model will be based - likely integrated with AdWords. We blogged about this two weeks ago, and wrote about it in the current issue of Local Media Journal.

PPCall as an ad model is attractive because of the large segment of SMEs that don't have a Web site, and those that prefer calls to clicks.

From the NYT article:

About 70 percent of those businesses do not have Web sites, so pay-per-click advertising makes no sense for them. But even those who do have sites often lack the sophistication or the time to manage a pay-per-click campaign, which can require considerable tweaking to outbid competitors without spending too much.

Pay-per-call advertisers must still manage campaigns, but the approach appears so effective that for many it is worth the effort. Judson Brady, the owner of Broad Street Flowers, an Atlanta-based floral service, said he paid Yahoo about $1.25 for each prospect who clicked on his search page advertisement, and 5 percent of those prospects ordered.

By contrast, Mr. Brady said he paid Ingenio around $4.15 for each call from a prospect � most of whom see the ads on AOL, which introduced its pay-per-call service last year. More than a third of the callers place an order. "We're lucky to break even on the pay-per-clicks, but with pay-per-call we'll make $25 profit per order," he said. "My only complaint is there's not more of it."


Google's entrance to the click-to-call world will vastly accelerate the adoption curve of the technology among SMEs as the company's reach, influence and brand recognition will help spread the message that pay-per-call marketing can be an attractive option for some businesses, as outlined above.

More importantly the tool will allow Google to tap into the segment of SMEs that don't advertise with AdWords, or don't even have a Web site (thus not being sold on the value of clicks). Combine this with Google's strategy to drive small business Web site development through its new free Web development and hosting service, and it becomes clear that Google is attempting to penetrate much further into local and SME markets.

It will be interesting to see how well it pulls this off.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Mike Boland at  18:15 | permalink | comments [2] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 27 2006
Monday News Roundup
A lot is happening today. Here is a quick sampling (with additional analysis to follow).

� Quarterly revenue increases for Internet search companies are outlined here.

� Homestore.com has announced the acquisition of Moving.com, which it will consolidate with Homestore, HomeBuilder and Rentnet under the new name Move.com. It will launch in the next few months as a "full service search and moving solution to consumers." More here.

SEW reports that MSN adCenter will increase ad impressions served on MSN search results by 70 percent.

� Search Engine Journal reports that new site Digglicious combines social search driven news aggregator Digg with Yahoo!'s social bookmarking engine del.icio.us. It looks like an interesting model that combines the social search aspects of bookmarking and news content. We'll report more on this in an upcoming White Paper on social search.

� Search Engine Journal also speculates on flash-based animated ads in Google's AdSense publisher network and the effect it could have on conversions. Elsewhere, Google is adding payments and selling tools to Google Base.

� Om Malik reports on the launch of Edgeio, which uses tagging to aggregate classified ads that are published by individuals throughout the Web on their own blogs or sites. We wrote about the company earlier this month here, and more on the launch can be found in ZDNet's coverage here.

� Om also reports on the possible upcoming launch of Google Calendars here.

� Lastly, digital product placement on television is an interesting concept that will have some possible targeting opportunities on IPTV. It has already been used on some sitcoms, and related technologies are under development, according to the Lost Remote blog.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Mike Boland at  17:50 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 27 2006
Ask Relaunches
I'm busy finishing my presentation for a panel on search engine user behavior later this afternoon at SES. But I wanted to chime in, as many others have already done, on the new Ask.com. The IAC-owned search engine has rebranded and changed its interface to be simpler and graphically more appealing. (Barry Diller spoke this a.m. at SES, which I missed because I was stuck in traffic for 2 hours from JFK.)

Ask has vertically arrayed (no pun intended) all the different specialized content and structured search areas, including local. Interestingly, this approach makes them more prominent than they were in the old "horizontal" navigation scheme.

Ask gained a tiny amount of market share, according to some of the numbers, over the course of the last year. We'll see if the new interface and the new brand will further boost usage of the engine. So far, I like what I see visually.

Here's more detail from Search Engine Watch and Search Engine Journal.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  09:30 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 24 2006
Newspapers, Classifieds and Yellow Pages
I was at the Newspaper Association of America's Marketing conference a couple of days ago in Orlando, where it was a humid 80 degrees. I was unfortunately only there for one day, moderating a panel on how to compete with free classifieds, schmoozing and wandering the exhibit hall talking to vendors.

The panel I moderated was on competing with free classifieds and featured:

  • Tom Finke: Tribune Co.
  • Dexter LaPierre: The San Diego Union-Tribune
  • David Prizer: ANG Newspapers, CNP Northern Division
  • Fran Wills: Denver Newspaper Agency
  • Garry Wiseman: Microsoft
This panel (and the conference) had a number of interesting takeaways for me.

The panelists were fairly forthcoming about their successes and failures in their various experiments with free classifieds. Among the surprises were: 1) almost without exception they were unsuccessful in upselling from free ads and 2) they expressed that their newspaper brands carried a certain amount of "baggage" and they potentially needed to create new online brands to effectively compete online.

The Denver Newspaper Assn's YourHub.com was such an example. While the creation of new brands may liberate newspapers from some of the constraints of the traditional newspaper form, it may be very destructive of the brand over the long term � especially, ironically, if these sites are successful.

The point about newspaper "brand baggage" was not uniformly held by all the panelists but several of them did have that view. I personally believe that newspapers need to focus on the overall user experience online and that their brands are actually strengths to be leveraged in local markets. But I also believe the online product is fundamentally different from the print product and needs to be reinvented online.

Unfortunately, there was not enough time to get into all the interesting facets of the conversation. We also didn't get into an important area: syndicating classifieds.

The only non-newspaper person on the panel was MSN/Windows Live Expo's Garry Wiseman, who proved himself truly wise and walked away with tons of business cards after he made specific partnership overtures to the newspapers.

While overall there was still a bit of the "deer in the headlights" quality to some of the discussions I had at the show, most of the people whom I spoke with were smart, aware of the market dynamics and the competition they face, and were ready to take chances and experiment to find out what will work. And there were lots of vendors ready to sell them lots of "solutions."

There was also a local search panel later in the day with Google, Local.com, Tucson.com and Kudzu.com. I thought the panel was very good (I did not moderate). The not-so-subtext on the panel was how, with more effective sites and distribution online, the newspapers might more effectively compete with Yellow Pages for ad dollars.

In general I think the newspaper publishers are going to come much harder at YP advertisers in the next couple of years. The question is execution ... but the intention is clearly there.


Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  18:37 | permalink | comments [2] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 24 2006
Google Page Creator Take 2
I just received a briefing from Google on Page Creator, which was the "20%" pet project of Justin Rosenstein, project manager, who said he wanted to create a simple tool that would enable anyone to build a site quickly and easily.

As I indicated yesterday it's very easy � WYSIWYG � to use. It's about as easy or maybe easier than blogging software. And Rosenstein said that the 100 megs of storage is considerably more than most free blogging platforms offer.

People like to attribute much more calculation to Google than actually exists in most of these product rollouts. And I'm somewhat guilty of that myself. I got carried away with the small business and potential strategic implications of this for Google. But I buy it when they say this was intended for anyone who wanted to build a site and that it was not specifically targeting SMEs.

But now that it's here, let's see how SMEs respond.

It's also the case that every teenager in America (or around the globe) could build a personal page on Google. That's an equally compelling alternative or parallel use case. That goes to Chris Sherman's MySpace comparison.

It will be interesting to see how the product evolves after the first rounds of feedback.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  16:24 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 24 2006
Why Do We Care So Much About IPTV? II
Here is another good introductory article (with quite a headline). This one is about some of the killer apps we can expect out of IPTV. It's an interesting (albeit long) read, with a fun list of possibilities.

Elsewere, Comcast reported that video-on-demand orders increased 71 percent in 2005 � showing that demand for VOD is on the rise. The implications for IPTV are clear, as it will be based on the concept of VOD.

VOD in fact seems to be getting a lot of attention. Most recently DirecTV announced the launch of a broadband-based VOD service this week.

A roundup of broadband TV news is here
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Mike Boland at  15:00 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]



Feb 24 2006
Internet Adoption Flat?
According to Parks Associates' recent research, written up in this CNET article, Internet adoption is essentially flat in the US. The firm found 64% of US homes had Internet access, up from 62% in 2004. It also made the prediction that adoption would only grow 3% by the end of the decade.

The at-home broadband percentage was 42 and dial-up claimed 22% of US households according to the research.

There are lots of responses. Here are some:

  • In early 2004, Nielsen//NetRatings reported that 75% of US homes had Internet access (who's right?).
  • Approximately 80% of US workers have access to the Internet at work (Nielsen again). This is where lots of shopping and other non-work related online behavior happens. A 360 degree view of the American Internet audience must consider at-work usage also.
  • The most attractive demographic/income groups have broadband at home (well established)
  • If you segment to look at the attitudes and behaviors of younger consumers, you'll see quite different attitudes and quite a different relationship to the Internet and technology. Here the Internet is just assumed as a necessary ultility and communication tool.
I would say no traditional media should take comfort from this research. Rather the concern needs to be on the online side and specifically about high-speed access. If it's not growing than the corresponding revenue models and related consumer behaviors might not grow as quickly. That's where the issue is.
Blog: Local Media Blog
 
posted by  Greg Sterling at  14:56 | permalink | comments [0] | trackbacks [0]





page 2 of 131 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   next pages





The Kelsey Group, 600 Executive Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540-1528
Tel: (609) 921-7200 Fax: (609) 921-2112 EMail: [email protected]
Copyright© 2005 The Kelsey Group. All Rights Reserved.